Uses of JavaScript JSON

What is JavaScript JSON? Why it is used by most of the companies right now?

Last updated:7/20/2021 1:35:40 AM

1 Answers

Ethan Karla
Ethan Karla

JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a standard text-based format for representing structured data based on JavaScript object syntax. It is commonly used for transmitting data in web applications (e.g., sending some data from the server to the client, so it can be displayed on a web page, or vice versa). You'll come across it quite often, so in this article we give you all you need to work with JSON using JavaScript, including parsing JSON so you can access data within it, and creating JSON.

Why JSON used so much -

JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a standard text-based format for representing structured data based on JavaScript object syntax. It is commonly used in web applications to transmit data (for example, sending some data from a server to a client so that it can be displayed on a web page, or vice versa).You'll see this often, so in this article we give you everything you need to work with JSON using JavaScript, including parsing the JSON so you can access the data within it, and creating the JSON. Can you

To understand the usefulness and importance of JSON, we need to understand a little bit about the history of interactivity on the web.

In the early 2000s, interactivity on the web began to transform. At the time, the browser acted mainly as a dumb client for displaying information, and the server worked its best to prepare the content for display. When a user clicks on a link or button in the browser, a request will be sent to the server, the server will generate the required information as HTML, and the browser will render the HTML as a new page. This pattern was sluggish and inefficient, requiring the browser to re-render everything on the page, even if only part of the page had changed.

Because full-page reloading was expensive, web developers looked to new technologies to improve the overall user experience. Meanwhile, the ability to make web requests in the background while a page is being shown, which was recently introduced in Internet Explorer 5, was proving to be a viable approach for loading data incrementally for performance. Instead of reloading the entire content of the page, clicking the Refresh button will trigger a web request that will load in the background. When the content was loaded, the data could be manipulated, saved and displayed on the page using JavaScript, the universal programming language in the browser.

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